Koffels Solicitors and Barristers – Client found Not Guilty of Attempted Murder

Koffels have recently acted for a client in the District Court of NSW who was found not guilty of attempted murder charge. The Police charged our client with multiple offences including intent to cause grievous bodily harm, the most serious of which was ‘intent to murder.’ Koffels have successfully advocated for our client who was found to be not guilty under the section 38 (1) of the Mental Health (Forensic Provisions) Act, the matter was heard before Hatzistergos,DCJ without jury.

The case has been recognised in publication on the NSW Caselaw website for the successful defence of our client. The judgement/verdict in R v Anderson has been assigned the medium neutral citation: (2017) NSWDC 148.

The precedent achieved by our firm led to a result whereby the client, as hoped for by his family, is receiving the care and support he would otherwise never receive within the normal confines of the general prison system.  A win for our client, our firm and social justice.

 

For details of this precedent case, we provide the following link:   https://www.caselaw.nsw.gov.au/decision/5942324ae4b074a7c6e167b5

Koffels Successfully Defends Centrelink Claim on Behalf of TV Host

For a while it seemed that the host of The Biggest Loser was going to live up to the title of her reality television show by being exposed as a welfare cheat.

But Ajay Rochester, who was once an overweight pensioner called Lee Ann Towler, completed another transformation yesterday from “biggest loser” to “biggest victim”: a single mother, whose only crime was financial untidiness, making her a high profile scapegoat in the hands of overzealous bureaucrats.

Rochester, 39, pleaded guilty in the Downing Centre Local Court to 23 offences for claiming a Centrelink benefit from October 1999 to December 2005, even though she was not entitled to the full payment for about 16 weeks during that period.

But she escaped a criminal record for welfare fraud under the controversial legal provision that gives magistrates the discretion not to impose convictions and was ordered into a $1500 good behaviour bond